thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info
thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing
"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "
Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 
The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
Zoom Info

thedsgnblog:

Joe Ling   |   http://behance.net/JoeLing

"The logo is four letterforms drawn from two different perspectives.  The letters are freestanding forms designed to represent IKEA’s furniture in a room, showing the ability to mix and match with different angles, styles, and perspectives. The logo is organic, just like IKEA, it changes from a black line to a colored one to fit its context. The rest of the identity is based around the four primary colors (all sampled from current IKEA ranges) and the idea of assembly. The logo is often split up across several different elements (business card, and lanyard) which requires interaction to assemble and create the logo - exactly what IKEA is all about. "

Joe Ling is a second year Graphic Design student at Norwich University of the Arts. He has a particular passion for print design, editorial design, branding, and analogue/digital photography. 

The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe